Saturday Links: Sunday, September 24

Source: Turkish government news outfit Andalou Agency.

Source: Turkish government news outfit Andalou Agency.

Clickbait & Impact: How Academia Has Been Hacked - LSE Impact

“‘The case for colonialism’ is a travesty, the academic equivalent of a Trump tweet, clickbait with footnotes. … Of course, none of this is accidental. It is a well-planned provocation, an argument that feeds off the criticism it is designed to create, and references it as evidence of the prevailing ‘orthodoxy’. If this sounds familiar, this is exactly the same strategy with which the alt-right movement has hacked its way into public debates.”

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‘Why So Much Cruelty?’ - The Nation

Tunisia’s progressive attempts at truth and reconciliation are hamstrung by past horrors and present corruption.

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Hold the Egg Sandwich: Egyptian TV is Calling - New York Times

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Media in the Middle East: A new study shows how the Arab world gets and shares digital news - Nieman Lab

Interesting tidbits: comparative advantage of WhatsApp for Arabic news readers; small number of Twitter users, even in countries affected by Arab Spring; high levels of trust in media; and Instagram as the major source of news for Qataris.

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Computational Propaganda in Canada: The Use of Political Bots - Computational Propaganda Research Project

“When Canadians discuss bots, they are largely treated as a novelty: a journalistic experiment, a one-off hack or a blip on the electoral radar. But Canadians risk trivializing an important debate about the future of its democracy. The limited influence of bots is probably a temporary phenomenon.”

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Resurrection of Traditional Leadership Reignites Self-governance Debate Among Druze - Chatham House

Elements in the Syrian government recently “supported bringing back an 18th-century Druze document known as ‘Blood Spill’ into effect. The document allows major Druze families to take blood revenge in cases where a Druze commits a crime against another Druze. … Resurrecting this document not only reflects the regime's attempt at consolidating its control at the local level, but also the agent/client relationship between the regime and the traditional leaders.”

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In Turkey’s New Curriculum, Ataturk, Darwin and Jihad Get Face-Lifts - New York Times

Erdogan has always worked to change Turkish society on a generational scale. This is no different. A few of the changes:

“When high school students in Turkey arrive for the fall term, Charles Darwin will be conspicuously absent from biology classes. In elementary school religion classes, teachers will promote the nonviolent meaning of the word jihad — ‘to struggle’ — as ‘love of homeland.’ And, perhaps most significantly in a country where the image of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, who created the modern secular Turkish state in 1923, is plastered everywhere, references in schools to Ataturk are expected to be downgraded.”

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A Russian Energy Firm Boosts the Political Power of Iraq’s Kurds - Stratfor

“Once complete, [a new Russian] pipeline will transform the way the autonomous region in northern Iraq exports its energy. And its effect on regional politics will be no less dramatic.” Ankara has already declared oil and gas exports to Turkey will be frozen after the referendum.

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George Osborne’s Revenge - Esquire

One off-topic link, because there’s something almost Victorian about the zaniness of post-Brexit politics.